Algonquin Park to Ottawa at 16,000 KM per hour – or, how to beat an erroneous YouTube Copyright claim

As we were leaving Algonquin Park at the end of August, I decided I would try the time lapse feature in iOS on my nifty new iPhone SE to make a short video highlighting the drive home.

I used my trusty hand-held tripod and phone mount and turned it on and off at various points on the trip. Next time, I’ll see about some kind of mount so I don’t have to hold it.

Initially, this was going to be done real quick. Then I crashed into the wall of reality at Mach 13. There was WTL confetti everywhere.

I decided on a minute long video to make it quick and digestible, then started looking through my library of music that I have rights to use online.

After an hour of flailing around through my collection, I couldn’t find anything that met my… acoustic vision, so it occurred to me that I had a copy of GarageBand installed.

After a few minutes of reacquainting myself with GarageBand, I started clicking on samples and began to build the piece. Forty minutes later, I had something I was happy enough with, and finished under my self-imposed one hour deadline.WTL-2016-Algonquin-to-Ottawa-Background

I exported the video with the music mixed in, uploaded it to YouTube, and made a note to myself to write up a blog post for the following Monday to release it.

Later that day, I received notification from YouTube that there had been a copyright claim made against my freshly-uploaded video.YouTube Copyright Claim notification

I read through my options, and decided I would dispute it; it *was* all my content after all.

Fortunately, I tend to keep things, so I re-opened the GarageBand project for the tune and made a quick screen recording video explaining how I made it, and played the song through, commenting on a few parts, exported it and dropped it into my Dropbox public folder, and wrote my response:
The video was shot on my iPhone. The music was composed by me in
Garageband using the default samples installed by Apple. Here’s a video of the Garageband project:
https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/xxxxxxx/Garageband-of-Algonquin-Park-to-Ottawa-2016-09-23.mp4

This part was pre-written:

I have a good faith belief that the claim(s) described above have been made in error. and that i have the right(s) necessary to use the contents of my video for the reasons I have stated. I have not knowingly made any false statements, nor am I intentionally abusing this dispute process in order to interfere with the rights of others. I understand that filing fraudulent disputes may result in termination of my YouTube account. I understand that my video will be viewable by the claimant(s) so that they can review my dispute.
YouTube Copyright dispute filing

Satisfied, I clicked Submit and waited. Four days later, I received an email stating that the copyright claim to my material had been released.YouTube Copyright claim released

In the scheme of things, I think it went pretty well – I’ve read of other folks having a nightmare of a time. I’m glad I thought to make the video documenting the GarageBand project showing how I arrived at the final piece.

The song is available for your use licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License and can be found on the audio samples page. I’ve even included the Garageband project to make changing it easier.

If enough people would like, I’ll whip up a quick tutorial on how I made the tune in Garageband (basically a lot of clicking and listening).

Follow up on the events of July 10, 2016

Flowers and candles for Tarique LegerThis post is a direct follow up to my previous post
The blood on my hand, so I suggest you start there if you haven’t read that.

It’s been a bit over two weeks since Tarique Leger lost his life after he was shot leaving the Flatbook unit in our building, becoming Ottawa’s ninth murder of 2016.

One thing that we’d like to be clear about; neither of us considers what we did “courageous”, “heroic”, “worthy of a medal” or anything remotely like that; as some people have suggested to us. There are people who deal with this level of tragedy day in and day out – for years; the police, paramedics, firefighters, emergency room doctors, the 911 dispatchers – they’re a massive team of people who work to keep us safe and help us when our lives are at their worst, and they suffer greatly for it. Those people are heroes.

We did what we thought was the right thing to do; what we’d like to think that others would have done if they’d been in our place.

I’ve said it to a few people; one of the worst things that could have happened to me is if I had done nothing – then the mental repercussions of not having tried; not done anything; that would have been horrible. We tried. We did our best, and eventually I’ll be okay with that.

If you are the kind of person to turn away, I’d like you to take a few minutes in a quiet place and reflect on that. What if it was you? Wouldn’t you want someone to come out and help you? Then you should do the same, because someday, it might *be* you.

Don’t have confidence in your first aid training? Take a refresher. Even if you don’t have any training, the 911 dispatcher will walk you through step by step until help arrives.

Tracey and I have received a wonderful outpouring of support from friends, family and strangers. Thank you all – it’s meant the world to us both. Some of your comments have literally moved me to tears (the good kind, that make you feel loved).

Many have suggested we seek post-trauma counselling; I’ve never been good at talking about things with strangers – I tend to internalize everything, analyze it myself, and deal with it.

Honestly, Tracey and I will be fine. If for any reason we are not, we have each other, our friends, and the ability to reach out for support if we think there is a need.

Aftermath;

The Tuesday afterwards, I left home to meet a client, and came upon people gathered out front of our place; Tarique’s sister and friends. I spent about twenty minutes with them answering heart-breaking questions before I had to head off for a meeting. As I left, I handed them my card, told them if they needed anything to let me know.

Shortly after my meeting wrapped up, Tarique’s father called me to thank Tracey and I for our efforts. I’d planned to spend the rest of the day working at “my office”, but packed up and went home. I arrived, spoke at length with Tarique’s parents – and my heart broke again; they’re the ones who are really suffering – they lost their son, and they don’t know who or why.

Talking with them and Tarique’s friends reminded me of how differently white people and black people see the police, how they’re treated, how the general public understands the machinations of a major investigation, and how it might be possible to improve communication for all involved. I did my best to explain what I understand to be the process, which I think helped, but… I’m going to have to think about this a bit more before I send off the email the Ottawa Police Service about that.

They left flowers and candles; it will be a long time – if ever – before I can walk out of the place and not think of Tarique, his father, mother, sister, and friends I met that day, the dead connecting the living.

We finally managed to get our follow-up video interviews scheduled early Friday morning (eight in the morning is really, really early for me). We went down to the police station, met with the detective and were interviewed separately, which is about the extent of our official involvement in the investigation unless there is a trial, in which case one or both of us may be called upon to testify.

Questions;

I’ve received a fair number of questions since the post, so I thought I’d gather them up and get them out of the way in one bunch.

Do we feel less safe now?

No. We’ve lived in the neighbourhood for going on twenty years, and the character of the area hasn’t changed; if anything I think it’s gotten safer. That said, I did have a conversation with the owner of FlatBook about improving safety and security of their bookings.

How fast were the police there?

I checked my phone log today; the 911 call duration was seven minutes. I’d estimate the first officer arrived in four minutes or less.The call ended (I believe) once I had been relieved by the police officer.

Why didn’t you just stay in your place where it was safe?

Technically we both violated the first rule of first responders; make sure the scene is safe. In the scheme of things, I think it was the correct decision.

Has this changed your position on gun control?

No. I’ve been in favour of restricting access to firearms greatly, registering every existing weapon, and requiring extensive background checks & training for a long time. Tarique’s murder reaffirmed to me that my position is correct.

Seeking Publication?

A few of you have made reasonable arguments that I should seek to publish the original post more widely to help increase awareness of the impact of gun violence on our society. It’s the Internet; isn’t that wide enough? I am considering revoking my “no reporters” statement. We’ll see where this leads.

I received a couple of questions about “the gory details”.

No.

The blood on my hand

July 26, 2016: There is now a follow-up post.

I’m writing this to help me work out what happened. I’ve repeated it often enough to various police officers, but I need work through this.

Last night didn’t go as I expected at all. I got home from work just shy of eleven after a nice walk home in the light rain, chatted with Tracey about our day for a bit, tucked her in, then was editing until about 1:30 on a client project, when I decided to close my eyes for a few minutes on the couch to think… and promptly fell asleep.

I’m a sound sleeper. There was some noise outside – enough to set Sprocket off, even with the fan running in the window, which brought me to semi-consciousness. I heard three pops – which I hazily discounted to leftover fireworks, then maybe the sound of cars driving away. Strange thing to do; set off fireworks and then drive away quickly. Like I said, I was asleep, and when I’m asleep, I tend to want to stay asleep.

That said, a few seconds later, Tracey woke me up and told me someone was in the street, and headed out the door. I grabbed my phone, looked outside, dialled 911, dug out my head phones and followed.

I asked the dispatcher for an ambulance and police, as I thought the person had been shot.

When I got downstairs, I know Tracey said something to me, but I don’t remember what it was as I was answering the 911 dispatcher’s questions. I was transferred to someone who was asking questions as I was trying assess ABC (airway, breathing, circulation). It’s surprisingly hard to remember training when someone else is talking in your ear.

The kid had no measurable pulse that I could find on his wrist or carotid artery. I couldn’t feel breath or see movement. He didn’t respond to anything I did.

About this time, a car quickly turned onto our street, and accelerated hard towards us. For the first time, I was scared. I think I yelled at Tracey to get inside, and I tried to decide if I’d have time to jump behind a nearby car or not.

Fortunately, it was an unmarked police car instead of the shooters returning.

The officer was at my side in seconds, performed the the sternal rub (which I forgot) and we examined kid, found an entry wound, the rolled him over to check for there was an exit wound.

I started CPR, counting off every twenty compressions for the dispatcher so he’d know my progress.

While performing compressions, I remember looking at the wound, marvelling at how very small it was. His eyes, mouth, the way the light from a near by streetlight was falling on his skin. He’s just a kid with cool hair.

I got to a bit over one hundred before the ambulance seemingly appeared out of no where and a police officer relieved me as the paramedics set up. A defibrillator that I didn’t recognize was placed on him (not that I have any specific experience with them – it just doesn’t look like any of the ones I’ve ever seen). By this time, I was asked to move back to the building.

The initial interviews started. What did we see, what did we hear, the order of events, repeated often to different officers.

We were asked to fill out witness statements and that we could go upstairs to do them. Tracey went to her desk and I to mine.

My hand writing is terrible. Always has been, and it shows no promise of getting any better.

I can’t remember his face. I looked into his eyes and I can’t remember his face.

I filled out the witness statement as well as I could.

While I was writing, I noticed that there was a bit of blood on my hand. Could have been his, more likely mine from the rocks that were on the sidewalk while I was on my hands and knees beside him. I put my pen down, walked to the kitchen and washed my hands.

Fucking people with their fucking guns.

Just a couple of days ago, I was discussing my distaste for violence with a friend. It should always be the very last resort, as resorting to violence is the failure of our ability to communicate our differences. Churchill said it differently – “to jaw-jaw is always better than to war-war”.

We finished filling out the statements, brought them downstairs and answered additional questions. I explained what FlatBook was a bunch of times (it’s like Uber, but for apartments).

Guilt.

Cognitively, I understood (and still do) I was at his side as fast as was possible and that getting there any quicker would have made no appreciable difference. Emotionally, however is a different minefield. Could I? What if? How about if? Maybe? If I had?

No.

There was nothing we could have done that would have changed the outcome.

I just wanted to help save him. We both did.

We spent the rest of the morning in a fair state of shock, but the police we dealt with were friendly and kind. We chatted with neighbours, and once we were cleared to leave, we sought out the familiar; Brunch. Bacon. Friends. I did my Final Cut Pro X talk at ByMUG then came home, answered some email, then had a nap.

It’s been over 26 hours since this started. I now know his name; Tarique Leger. Just a kid – the same age I was when I moved to Ottawa. Someone has lost a son. Others have lost a friend.

I’ve seen a bit of speculation online that this was drug-related – I have no idea and honestly, it doesn’t matter.

Whatever it was, it certainly wasn’t worth his life.

I think of the blood on my hand and realize that it doesn’t matter at all whose it was.

To my friends; I’m not yet ready to talk about it with anyone except Tracey and the police, as we were all there. When I’m ready, I’ll let you know.

To reporters: No, you may not quote this. It’s not for you. Please respect that.

There is now a follow-up post.

Thank you all for saying yes.

This all started when I found out my friend Laurie was too ill to make it to this year’s Ottawa ComicCon. Over Skype we plotted a few ways she could visit the convention safely – I suggested we get her a functioning biohazard suit with mask – a cool *and* functional costume.

While that would likely keep her safe, it wasn’t worth the risk, so she reluctantly stayed home.

Working the Ottawa Browncoats booth is fun; we basically hang out, promote our big fundraiser in September and generally just talk to Browncoats and sometime encourage people who haven’t seen it to watch it. I promised to take plenty of photos; which I did do, but I had an idea.

I started asking people who stopped by the booth if I could take their photo and record video of them wishing Laurie to get well soon.

This is where I was impressed with the ComicCon community. Every single person or group I asked immediately said yes, and I rapidly accumulated over seventy videos plus a few that Tracey (my wife) and Gailene shot.

My goal was to surprise Laurie, so I had to construct a bit of a ruse at the beginning of the video so she would think that it was just a bunch of photos set to music, then started the get-well videos.  If you want to jump straight to the well-wishes, here you go.

I’m pleased to report that the video worked as I’d hoped. She was surprised and moved.

As a community, I thought it was important point out that a bunch of people spending a two minutes each of time can really help someone going through a tough time. Thank you all for saying yes; it reaffirmed my confidence in people.

Sometimes, it’s the little things, right?

Vacation Reading 2015

Another year of vacation, and another pile of books devoured, both dead tree and audiobooks. I know there’s a movement to ereaders, but I’m just not a fan of then yet. Maybe I’ll try again next year.

Stats: Twenty-five plus books, 3,500+ pages and over 140 hours of audiobooks (70+ at double speed).

Here’s the list for your perusal:

IMG_2845An astronaut’s guide to life by Chris Hadfield, suggested by @LeilaDancer. [dead tree]A one-day read, full of interesting stories about his journey to being an astronaut and the manner in which he pretty much single-mindedly did everything in his power to achieve his goals.


IMG_2850The Martian
by Andy Weir, suggested by… oh, five people, including my sister. [audiobook]I blew right through this book. I hear there’s a movie coming (trailer), and I know it will be hard to carry over all of the book into two hours, but boy, with Ridley Scott at the helm and Matt Damon as the main character, this could be *awesome*.

IMG_2864Darwinia by Robert Charles Wilson [dead tree]I’ve read this before – apparently back in 2004 while on vacation, but it’s been long enough that I only vaguely recalled the broadest strokes of the story.  Enjoyed it again.

51Sx2pXprjL._SL300_Playing Solitaire and Other Stories, by Mark Shainblum [audiobook]The first two stories were good, but I really enjoyed The Break Inspector (third story) – I loved the idea.

415tYy+YfEL._SX333_BO1,204,203,200_A Brief History of Humankind Sapiens by Yuval Noah Harari [dead tree]The book felt like a bit of a ramble, but I did find the book well worth reading, covering the evolution of our species and how thinking, farming and science have made us what we are today.

51vkEdOFg+L._SL300_My Early Life, by Winston Churchill [audiobook]Covering Churchill’s earliest memories up, through school, into his escape after being captured during the Boer war in South Africa, and his return home.

51dFNtIkQUL._SL300_What If? Serious scientific answers to absurd hypothetical questions, by Randall Monroe. [audiobook]I’ve been a fan of the XKCD webcomic for years and when I heard he was putting a book out from his “What if?” blog, I knew I was going to buy it. When the audiobook came out – read by your friend and Internet hero Wil Wheaton, it was a sure thing. Well research hilarity follows.

61egBtsNiML._SL300_Working Stiff: Two Years, 262 Bodies, and the Making of a Medical Examiner by Judy Melinek, MD & TJ Mitchell [audiobook]On last year’s trip, I read Stiff: The Curious Lives of Human Cadaver, and enjoyed it, so I thought a book about the life of a medical examiner would be interesting, and it was. Morbid humour, stories about murder, death, and her work during the 9/11 crisis.

519Y83MOuPL._SL300_Six Easy Pieces; essentials of physics explained by its most brilliant teacher, by Richard P Feynman. [audiobook]I love physics, and listening to Richard Feynaman is always a treat – this was an introduction to the basics – I know, I know – I already *know* this stuff, but I loved hearing him talk about it. Audio quality is low (recorded on reel-to-reel gear in the 60s. I’d suggest re-recording this so those who would find the poor audio quality too serious of a distraction

51517dPwDcL._SL300_The Battle of Midway, Craig L Symonds. [audiobook]History is one of the topics I keep reading about, and the battle of Midway is regarded as the turning point of the war in the Pacific, and this book goes into deep detail, sometimes minute by minute, into the events leading up to and the battle.

51w0gLyYdEL._SL300_The Tell-Tale Heart & Other Stories by Edgar Allen Poe [audiobook]The Black Cat is one of my favourite stories by Poe (it’s last in the audiobook), and the Tell-tale Heart is brilliantly read.

61gKN36XzGL._SL300_Mars Rover Curiosity: An Inside Account from Curiosity’s Chief Engineer, by Rob Manning & William L Simon [audiobook]Space? Engineering? Robots? Interplanetary missions? Fascinating read.

41RTRiuK5mL._SL300_Orphans of the Sky, by Robert Heinlein. [audiobook]When I was reading this book, it *strongly* reminded me of a TV show I saw as a kid; The Starlost, by Harlan Ellison (as Cordwainer Bird). Orphans of the Sky is tale of people living in a generational starship who aren’t aware of the fact – to them the entire universe is the ship, the “muties” who inhabit other sections of the ship, and how they come to work together to save themselves. Enjoyed!

61mduTCVTSL._SL300_Sherlock Holmes – The Hound of the Baskervilles & the Adventure of the Dancing Men by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle [audiobook]
Classic story about Dr. Watson and Sherlock Holmes unravelling the mystery of a seemingly supernatural chain of deaths involving a huge hound. Probably my favourite Holmes story.

winterwolfThe Seraphimé Saga Volume 2: The Winter Wolf, by SM Carrière. [dead tree]
I read the first volume last year’s, which goes against my typical treatment of series. Long, long time readers will note anytime Robert J Sawyer has had a trilogy come out the Neanderthal Parallax & Wake, Watch & Wonder, I’ve waited until the entire series was out, *then* read the whole thing, usually in a day or two. I wish I’d done with with this series to fill some of the gaps my memory created in the past year. The book is a great end to the story, that left me rather teary-eyed (much to the writer’s pleasure, I’ve been told).

41TQX6Ue9uL._SL300_Spymaster by Tennent H Bagley. [audiobook]
Publication of this story was banned in Russia by the FSB, so it was published in the west, and even then, only after Sergey Kondrashev’s death. This book is a fascinating look into the KGB during the cold war, and some of the crazy operations that were pulled off, right under the noses of the Americans (and others)

51eGBh3jKRL._SL300_Treasure Island by Robert Lewis Stevenson [audiobook]
“Fifteen men on the dead man’s chest–
…Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum!
Drink and the devil had done for the rest–
…Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum!”
Need I say more? A classic I don’t think I’ve read in… over thirty years. ouch.

51Vmb71yKPL._SL300_How to succeed in business without really crying; lessons from a life in comedy by Carol Leifer. [audiobook]
The book boils down to dogged persistence, hard work, and Leifer’s sense of humour. Worth a read!

516YzHILAPL._SL300_SevenEves by Neal Stephenson [audiobook]
I inhaled this book in two days even though it was over 15 hours (at double-speed) long. A masterful tale of the end of the world, and how we survive it.

51XX53g78xL._SL300_BBC Cabin Pressure series 4 [audiobook]
Bought this on sale – just curious, but it’s a fast and funny radio series about a tiny charter airline, featuring Benedict Cumberbatch and others.

510qnPnlTsL._SL300_At the Mountains of Madness, by H.P. Lovecraft [audiobook]
I know, I know. I listened to this last year. But I do *love* this story, and it’s my vacation and I’ll listen to what I want to!

IMG_3227America’s Bitter Pill by Steven Brilliant [dead tree]
This is the story of how Obamacare came to be, and in some ways, how it didn’t really change anything for the companies that reap massive profits on the backs of ill Americans. A cautionary read for Canadians to the dangers of adopting a more American-style heathcare system (it’s a wildly bad idea).

41aheSIoQsL._SL300_The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul by Douglas Adams [audiobook, read by author]
I read this years ago, and when I saw it in iTunes, I decided it was worth a listen – more so because of *who* was reading it – Douglas Adams. The Dirk Gently story is wildly funny.

IMG_3229Dreamcatcher by Stephen King [dead tree]
This book was homework for me by Bob LeDrew of the KingCast podcast. I’d asked him what modern King novel I should read (I stopped reading him mid-Tommyknockers). Overall, it was formulaic Stephen King, I think, and even though I knew where the story was going, I *did* enjoy it.

51GBk6OfBnL._SL300_2001: A Space Oddessy by Arthur C Clarke [audiobook]
This is a book that was written at the same time as the movie, but diverges in a few interesting way, and I was surprised to hear that the introduction by Arthur Clarke was a recording of him. Obviously, 2001 (and the three sequels) are seminal works of science fiction, and I greatly enjoyed listening to the book version.

IMG_3343Podcasts
Yup, podcasts – I had about twenty left over from the gap caused by my work on the Bluesfest project, so when I ran out of audiobooks to read, I went through all of those. Yay for catching up!

Lost in Translation by Sofia Coppola [audiobook]
Technically this is a movie turned into an audiobook, similar to what I did with Firefly the series. I love this movie, and listening to the dialogue of the film took me right into it. Listening to the movie, you “see” many new things – the careful attention to music, background sounds, and I can focus completely on the dialogue.

Three issues of 2600
This is the only magazine that I subscribe to, and I think it’s been a decade now, maybe more. Normally there are four issues (yes, I read a year’s worth of 2600 while camping), but the Summer 2015 didn’t arrive until after we’d left for the park. For those that *don’t* know, 2600 is the “hacker quarterly”, with news and articles of interest.

I’m open to suggestions for 2016’s vacation reading.

Got home, and downloaded 94 podcasts. That’s going to take some time to chew through.

You can peruse some of the trip’s photos on my Flickr album.